The LG KM 900 Arenais a very stylish handset that comes with great features that include the built in music player fully equipped with Dolby Mobile sound enhanced stereo speakers, that would surely provide its users with high quality music entertainment. It also has FM radio with RDS that would enable the user to listen to their favourite radio stations and be able to get the latest music news. Here are the other features of the handset:

The LG KM 900 Arenacomes with eight gigabytes of internal memory as well as with an expandable memory card slot that can accommodate up to sixteen gigabytes of additional memory storage. This is achieved by using microSD memory cards.It also has EDGE technology for users to be able to have quick and easy data transfers.It also has Bluetooth connectivity and USB connectivity to allow users to be able to share files to other users who have compatible devices.

This mobile phone has WLAN Wi-Fi technology thus users would be able to be connected to the internet wirelessly.The call records of this handset can store up to forty entries for each, dialled, missed and received calls.This handset also comes with a proximity sensor for auto turn off.The LG KM 900 Arenaallows its users to create, send and receive simple text messages, multimedia messages with sound and photos and email messages.

It has a five megapixel camera that comes with LED Flash, auto focus and image stabilization features that enables the user to capture picture and videos with great quality.It also has a secondary VGA camera that can be sued for 3G video calls.The LG KM 900 Arenais available in silver and Titan Black colour casing.It has a built-in document viewer for users to be able to view their files in Word, Excel, PowerPoint and PDF format.

LG KF310, LG Venus KF600, LG Venus Purple are the popular offers and these mobile phone contracts are available on Online Mobile Phone Shop UK.

The clothes worn by certain professions identifiy them with the trade they practise when you see a white coat you automatically think medical professional, likewise battle fatgues bring to mind the armed forces.
While nurses have long worn a uniform it wasnt till the early 20 specifically with the spread of the 1918 Spanish Flu that surgeons started on the road to the surgical scrubs that are now mandatory.

Finally in the 40s Science had finally understood the correlation between patient wound infection rates and the adoption of surgical anti septic techniques. Not only were antiseptic gloves, masks, gowns and drapes used but even the instruments and supplies sterilised

How the colors of scrubs has changed over the years:

Pre 1940 : Nurses were required to wear uniform clothing -usually white but surgeon wore his street clothes and maybe an apron to protect their clothes

1940: in the beginning surgical staff started wearing white uniforms and scrubs to emphasize and show their cleanliness. However it was found that blood and fluids that would splash across the white clothing greatly alarmed people who came in contact with the operating staff.
In addition it was found that the pervasive use of white in the OT(Operating theater) cause eye strain. A change was in the making

1950-1960 : Medical apparel designers started experimenting with the coloration of the surgical scrubs. The first surgical scrubs were called surgical greens and afterward in the late 60s blue was introduced.- the popularity of these 2 colours grew, as the blood and fluids splattering were not prominently seen as compared to the white counterparts and it also solved the eye strain issue.

1970s: The OT (operating theater) uniform has transformed to a short-sleeve V-necked shirt and drawstring pants and mid length dress for women. A paper mask, latex gloves, surgical gown, and a surgical bouffant style hat make up what is considered the standard medical wear

1980 onward: Surgical scrubs were no longer simply green or blue. Surgical scrubs were available in a multitude colors and textures and by the mid 1980s, surgical

Are you looking for a new yoga mat? Or do you want to get into yoga and want to get your first own yoga mat? EMP Industries, an Australian owned and Melbourne based company is specialized in offering yoga mats. We understand that the needs and preferences of yogis vary. Therefore we have made it our goal to offer our customers the best yoga mats in the world at great prices.

Are you looking for a yoga mat that is anti-slip and provides you with the best traction? EMP Industries certainly has the solution for you. We offer yoga mats made out of 100% natural rubber, TPE, JUTE PER or foam. The best thing is that no matter what price category you are interested in, we will have the right yoga mat for you – from budget yoga mats to Jade Yoga Mats or VB yoga mats.

Our most popular mats are:
– Jade Yoga Mat (best traction and 100% rubber) — click here to view
– VB Yoga Mat (German manufactured high premium yoga mat) — click here to view
– Budget Foam Yoga Mat (great price!) — click here to view

Yoga mats are thinner than regular exercise or pilates mats to allow optimal balance while yet giving you some cushioning to support your knees, feet, hands, etc.. In order to hold poses it is necessary that yoga mats provide you with some form of traction and anti-slip behavior. This grip enables you to hold poses even when your hands and feet get sweaty. Some yoga mats even have moisture absorbing functionalities which means that excess sweat is absorbed by the mat giving you better grip. The regular size of a yoga mat is usually around 60 to 62cm wide and 172-176cm long. EMP also offers extra wide and/or extra long yoga mats for taller yogis (click here to view).

If you are travelling a lot with your yoga mat you might want to consider a thinner yoga mat that is lighter and easier to carry than some of the high quality mats.

Roughly, about 6% of the world’s population is vegetarian, a trend that is growing. Yet study after study shows that vegetarians are less healthy than their non-vegetarians peers. Why is this so? Surely a diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables should make you healthier, not less healthy, so what’s going on?

In the light of extraordinary new research it is becoming apparent that most vegetarians are in fact less healthy than their non-vegetarian peers. By “peers” I mean people of a similar socio-economic and cultural background. Any valid comparison between vegetarians and non-vegetarians must compare apples with apples. For example, any study that compared an affluent health-conscious vegetarian from California with an impoverished meat eater from the slums of Calcutta is not likely to be meaningful.

Recent studies are clearly showing that compared to their non-vegetarians peers, vegetarians are more at risk of diseases such as infertility, cancer, heart disease, eating disorders, mental disease, and obesity.

Several studies have compared health-conscious vegetarians with health-conscious non-vegetarians from the same demographic (the same socio-economic, health-conscious cohort). In other words, scientists have compared vegetarians and non-vegetarians from similar backgrounds so as to validate the results and they have come up with some surprising conclusions.

For example, in a study of 76,000 people conducted over many years data from five studies were pooled into a very large collaborative analysis of mortality in vegetarians and non-vegetarians (Appleby PN, Key TJ, Thorogood M, Burr ML, Mann J. Mortality in British vegetarians. Public Health Nutr. 2002 Feb;5(1):29-36).

The Appleby Study compared vegetarians and non-vegetarians, adjusted for age, sex and smoking. The results for all-cause mortality showed no significant difference between vegetarians and their non-vegetarian peers. Many studies have shown that vegetarians live longer than the population at large, but the Appleby Study showed that this is not the case when you compare people within the same demographic. The study concluded that ‘Overall mortality was the same between vegetarians and non-vegetarians. But vegetarians had 2.2 times the death rate from mental and neurological diseases as non-vegetarians.’

Several studies have compared vegetarians and non-vegetarians within the same demographic